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The Invincible M.A.E.


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Petr
harleymae

Hockey is lovely

Happy birthday, SDQ!!!

You can come live with me anytime you want. I have a big bed. (I'm going to get arrested any moment now, I can just feel it).

[Edit: Happy birthday to JS as well! Will write more JS fic in his honor, even if I have to stay up to do it. :D]

Mmm, hockey. I am so getting Center Ice next season. :)

I'm so glad the Devils won and the missing goal debacle didn't have an impact. Well except that the players' playoff statistics aren't right, but I don't think they care about that. Brodeur was awesome. :)

Chip is just as disturbed by announcers' comments as I am. He made the best face when they talked about Stevens standing Hossa up and applying backside pressure to him. He's also declared that Chara is a "big, ugly fuck" who should be deported, and gives me funny looks when I complain about Devils not being able to "enter the zone properly".

Ducklings playing today. That means more Petr!fic and also more Jigga spam. :)

Giguere's a great goalie; he just doesn't act like one
Michael Rand, Star Tribune

Published May 16, 2003
DSID16

ANAHEIM, CALIF. -- He has come to the brink of history and the edge
of every NHL player's boyhood dream by the simplest route:

Jean-Sebastien Giguere is unrelenting in the pursuit of being himself.

The Anaheim goalie might be more colorful if he talked to his
goalposts, put his pads on in a particular order or ate a ham
sandwich two hours before every game like many of his superstitious
peers. He might hear more "oohs" and "aahs" if he
created treacherous situations in net, then atoned for them by making
diving saves.

But just as he is abnormal by being normal off the ice, Giguere is
spectacular because he is so steady on it. Yes, he has made
jaw-dropping saves in the playoffs -- as Marian Gaborik well knows --
but what seems to define Giguere is an unrelenting drive to put
himself in the right place to succeed, then letting the odds take
care of themselves.

And just look at what has happened so far, as the Ducks try to close
out the Wild in Game 4 of the Western Conference Finals tonight:

He is only the sixth goalie in playoff history to record three
consecutive shutouts. His shutout streak of 213 minutes, 17 seconds
is about 35 minutes shy of the playoff record.

The Stars' Brenden Morrow already is the answer to a trivia question:
Who was the last man to score on Giguere? It was in the third period
of Game 6 of the conference semifinals.

Another shutout today would break too many records to mention. How
has he done it so far? By not thinking about it.

"I think about a shutout with about one second left in the
game," Giguere said. "You don't think about those sorts of
things. You have to focus on one shot at a time."

He's done that successfully 100 times in a row.

Giguere the goalie

Giguere is in this position because he is never out of position. He
gives shooters little room, then takes even those small crevices away
at the last possible moment. He has tormented the Wild, but Minnesota
players will get no sympathy from the Ducks.

"We feel the same way in practice," forward Steve Thomas
said.

Giguere also has benefitted from Anaheim's defense-first philosophy
and the Ducks' tremendous execution in the playoffs. Few teams are as
adept at blocking shots, clearing rebounds and giving their goalie a
good look at virtually every shot.

"The guys in front of me have been huge," Giguere said.
"Hockey is about team play, and a shutout streak like that
doesn't come just by the goalie doing it himself."

Giguere started refining his game at age 12 when he attended Francois
Allaire's famous hockey school in Quebec. Allaire is Patrick Roy's
personal coach -- as well as the goalie consultant for the Ducks and
Giguere, who idolized Roy growing up in Montreal.

Comparisons to Roy, who won a Cup at age 20 as a rookie, have been
coming Giguere's way lately. Although he is much older -- he turns 26
today -- this is Giguere's playoff debut. Wild coach Jacques Lemaire
was asked to compare Giguere to another famous contemporary, Martin
Brodeur, who helped Lemaire's New Jersey Devils win the 1995 Cup.

"They're very solid and they play with a lot of
confidence," Lemaire said. "You know, I think [Giguere] is
on top of his game right now."

It's hardly surprising to Allaire, who has watched the top junior
goalie in Canada in 1995 -- and 13th overall selection of the
Hartford Whalers that year -- become one of the NHL's top netminders.

"I'm really happy because he's a hard-working guy. Even two
years ago, when we were dead last in this conference, he never
stopped battling," Allaire said. "The day after a loss, he
was right back on the ice trying to stop as many pucks as he could.
This is not a miracle. It's something he's been reaching toward for a
long time."

Giguere the man

Even if his personality is along the straight and narrow, Giguere
does not conceal it. He is very accommodating with the media, even
speaking to reporters after game-day morning skates -- something
almost unheard of from a goalie. He seems to be enjoying the national
spotlight, while still keeping his focus when it comes time to play.

Anaheim coach Mike Babcock talked about Giguere's
"competitiveness, battle level and soul." It's best summed
up this way by the coach: "He's very demanding of himself."

He used to be a little more flaky -- had a little more goalie in him
-- until he decided idiosyncrasies were nothing but wasted energy
that could be used to stop pucks.

"I used to have different little superstitions. Over the years,
I sort of dropped them all," Giguere said. "It just
controls your life. You have to think about them, and if you don't do
them you're not going to play well. It's all silly. The only way
you're going to play well is if you work hard and do what you have to
do on the ice."

Now on game days, he makes sure he gets enough sleep. He eats
properly and drinks a lot of water. He says he tries to be as nice to
people as possible and enjoys the day as much as he can. Sometimes,
Giguere said, he walks his dog.

This guy is a goalie?

"He's definitely one of the more normal ones. He's very down to
earth and easy to talk to," Anaheim forward Paul Kariya said.
"If you could somehow get into the dressing room and watch the
interactions between players, you'd never think he was a
goaltender."

Alas, Giguere still hangs on to one superstition: he will not touch
hockey's Holy Grail, the Stanley Cup. He saw it in person twice: at a
parade in his native Montreal in 1993 to honor the Cup champion
Canadiens; and in 1995 in Edmonton, Alberta, at the NHL draft. Both
times, he resisted the urge to try to touch it.

The well-traveled Cup will be within Giguere's reach again next week,
when it will be on display in three Southern California locations.

"Maybe if I saw it today, I would touch it," Giguere said.
"No, probably not. That's a lie. I don't want to jinx
myself."

It's a nearly universal superstition among hockey players, so Giguere
can be forgiven. As Kariya said, "When I've dreamt about
touching it, it's been over my head."

Thanks to the guy they call Jiggy, the Ducks are one victory away
from getting their shot.


Mighty Ducks' Giguere playing like his idol

KEN PETERS, AP Sports Writer Thursday, May 15, 2003

(05-15) 16:49 PDT ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) --

Jiggy is a rather odd duck, a goaltender who doesn't seem the least
bit weird.

"I think I'm pretty much just a normal guy," said
Jean-Sebastien Giguere, the Mighty Ducks' goalie who keeps posting
goose eggs on the other side of the scoreboard.

Considering goaltenders think other guys are out to get them -- which
they are -- and that they constantly have hard rubber disks sailing
100 mph and plunking off their bodies, maybe goalies have a right to
be different.

But the 25-year-old Giguere is just one of the guys, chuckling like a
gleeful kid as he and his teammates kick a soccer ball in the hall
outside their locker room.

Steve Thomas, who's been around a lot of goaltenders during his 15
years in the league, said it's difficult to pick Giguere out of a
crowd.

"There are a lot of goalies I've played with who are eccentric
people, and he's definitely one of the guys in the room, just like
everyone else," Thomas said. "Nine times out of 10 you go
in a locker room and talk to a certain guy, and you can go, `Oh,
that's the goalie right there.'

"But with Jiggy, he thinks he's a power forward or something.
He's certainly not like a prototypical goalie."

His beard growing more scraggly as the Ducks go deeper into the
postseason, Giguere has been the hottest thing on ice during this
year's playoffs, his first.

Giguere (pronounced zhee-gair) takes a three-game shutout streak into
Friday night's game against Minnesota. A win by the Ducks, who swept
defending Stanley Cup champion Detroit in the first round and
eliminated top-seeded Dallas 4-2 in the second, will send Anaheim to
its first Cup finals.

As a kid growing up in Montreal, Giguere pretended he was Patrick
Roy, and he has been playing like his idol. He's 11-2 with four
shutouts in the playoffs, has a 1.24 goals-against average, and has
stopped all 98 Minnesota shots in the conference finals. His save
percentage is a phenomenal .960.

He hasn't allowed a goal in 213 minutes, 17 seconds, going back to
the third period of the Ducks' Game 6 victory over Dallas. The
playoff record, including games before the NHL's modern era, is
270:08 by Montreal's George Hainsworth in 1930.

By blanking Minnesota in Anaheim's 4-0 Game 3 victory, Giguere became
only the sixth goalie in NHL history to record three consecutive
shutouts in the playoffs; the first to have three in a row to start a
series since Toronto's Frank McCool in 1945; and the first to post
three zeros in a row in a Stanley Cup semifinal series.

Another streak Giguere has going is a 160:49 scoreless string in
overtime in the playoffs, second in league history only to Roy's
162:56.

Minnesota coach Jacques Lemaire said nothing his team has tried has
worked against Giguere.

"We tried to move the puck across, and he still made saves on
it. We tried in the other games to shoot more. He still made
saves," Lemaire said.

The Anaheim goalie's talent was obvious on a save early in Game 3
against the Wild, when he deftly dropped to his knees at the last
instant to block a shot by the playoffs' top scorer, Marian Gaborik,
on an uncontested breakaway.

"That's a phenomenal save," Ducks coach Mike Babcock said.

While he also considers Giguere a "normal guy," Babcock
said the goalie can be very intense.

"He has a great ability to read the game, but what makes him
what he is his competitiveness, his battle level, his soul," the
coach said. "He's demanding of his teammates by being demanding
of himself."


One thing that I've really respected about the Ducklings is how steady they are, no matter the circumstances. Watching them play, you can't tell if they're ahead or behind, or what point in the series. The only game in which I've seen them falter a bit is Game 5 vs Dallas. I hope that, win or lose, they keep their composure tonight.

A Ducks/Devils SCF would be really cool. Best friends Petr and Patrik, brothers Rob and Scott Niedermayer, awesome French-Canadian goalies Giguere and Brodeur, crappy power play, awesome penalty kill - I dunno, it's still a little too early to tell, but I'd really like that to be the match-up for the Final.

Joined the hockey slash fan fic webring! Whee! Thanks for setting it up, stormshaman.


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ahhhh centre ice *sighs whistfully*

*licks Petr*

*smiles at Giguere*

*hugs babcock* who I may or may not have a crush on lol

I hope our silly cable network gets upgraded by then!

*joins in licking*

*tackles JS*

Babcock is fun. :) Eee, you have a crush on him! *points*

Ahh I hope it works out that we can too

*grin* yummy!!

*giggles*

he is fun *ggg* Nooooo I may or may not :P

Ha! That means you do! *points some more*

*cries* He was so cool in the segment at hsi house, lol. And he wa sweet withhis kids, that kills me!!!

*shrieks* I didn't get to see it!!! Ahh, I miss so much good stuff. :P

it was on hnic :( his kids were so sweet, well you know for kids :P

I wonder if I'd get that on Center Ice. Probably not. :P

Hehe, kids scare me.

you might though if you got that feed youd get the intermission stuff I woudl imagine

*grin* me too

Whee! *tackles* Big beds are so much more fun, anyway. *hugs* Thank you so much, sweetie.

And tell Chip that Chara is so NOT a big ugly fuck and does NOT need to be deported. *smiles sweetly* I can fight my own battles with Chip on that topic.

*is tackled* *rolls around on big bed with SDQ* You are so welcome, hope you have a lovely birthday. :)

I'll pass the message on. :P

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