The Invincible M.A.E.


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Mae
harleymae

Mutants, alphas, metahumans, etc.

I've always enjoyed TV shows about people with special abilities. A bit odd given that I'm not really into superheroes. I guess the difference is in the superhero genre, somebody gets special powers and then they decide to slap on a costume and become either a hero or a villain. But there are so many other paths they could take! I find exploration of that territory more interesting.

My favourite take on the subject is The 4400. It's not the best written, doesn't have the most compelling characters, doesn't have great production values, but it had the most interesting idea (and a great theme song). People who have disappeared at different times in the past 60 years all return to one place simultaneously; they haven't aged and they all have special powers.

This is just such an amazing idea full of rich storytelling opportunities. Not only are the people dealing with having suddenly developed superpowers, they're also dealing with appearing in a time that's not their own; their relatives and friends have all aged and assumed that they're dead, and the ones who disappeared the earliest have nobody left at all.

I was trying to think of all the TV shows that fit into this description. I excluded shows with traditional superheroes or other "standardized" superhumans like vampires, werewolves and witches. I also excluded shows where the focus is on one person (like Kyle XY).

Thinking all the way back to the '80s, I think my fondness for this type of show started with Misfits of Science. My friends and I loved this show (Johnny B!). I'm sure if I watched it now it would be super corny, but it was a nice portrayal of a bunch of outcasts banding together to help each other and also to do good. The characters were mostly young people, so there was teen drama stuff too. :P

I just read the Wiki page for the show and Tim Kring wrote for it! I wonder if this was the seed for Heroes and later, Touch.

Speaking of Heroes, that show had so much potential. It was great in its first season because it was not a standard comic superhero show, and that was the major mistake they made in S2--they turned it into one.

Sylar should have died permanently in S1. They made a very cowardly decision to bring him back in S2 because he was so popular with fans. It's okay to have viewers wish that somebody was still around; that's part of what makes a good story, the "what ifs".

And they screwed up with giving Mohinder superpowers. I feel like his role was the narrator of the story, and he should have been the moral center. He should have been the one to explain what all of it meant. S1 had focus and cohesiveness, and I think his perspective helped shape that. With him turning into the fucking Fly, the series lost that.

It actually improved a lot in the final season and got back to telling a good story and focusing on character development rather than just being a plot someone thinks of and throws people and lines in to support where it's going. Unfortunately, everyone had already stopped watching by that point.

Alphas is a show that I didn't expect to like as much as I did. They had a nice mix of personalities (Gary is my favourite; the technologically skilled character is usually my fave) and I liked the alpha-of-the-week format. I wasn't that excited about the direction they took in S2, getting much more serious and then the pointless tragic death of a character. The draw for me was watching the main characters adjust to living with their abilities and learning to work together as a team.

The Tomorrow People is the newest incarnation of the subgenre. It's a remake of a '70s British show that I never watched, so does that make the original the first series of its type? It's okay so far. I'm liking Jacob from Lost/Lucifer from Supernatural as the big bad, although the lead actor is not very attractive and seems especially old (even considering they usually use much older actors to play high school students). His cousin (Stephen Amell from Arrow) stole all the looks, I guess. The Tomorrow People leader is pretty cute, or at least more charming.

The tone of this show is similar to The Nine Lives of Chloe King although it's probably closest to the X-Men movie franchise.

Mr. Pavelski had a great game tonight! It makes me happy. He's probably the most consistent forward we have in terms of effort and effectiveness. Or maybe that's Logan. Err, they're tied! I'm happy with all of the players we have! Usually, there's at least one person on the team I don't like, occasionally someone really gross like Heatley (so happy every time I think of him... not being here), and I look at the guys on the ice and I'm mostly happy or at worst neutral.

Oh wait, we have Raffi Torres. Well he's on the IR. Won't see him for a while.

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The movie? I've heard good things about it but haven't seen it yet.

I liked it as another twist on the superheroes story, apparently it is going to be a TV series which would be good, or terrible, I mean it's tv who can say :)

Hmm, I think it had a sort of documentary/found footage look to it, which generally doesn't play well for serialized TV (The River, Siberia). Perhaps they will go with more of a traditional approach if it's turned into a TV series.

Mark Pellegrino has become the king of genre television shows (well, him, and maybe Mark Sheppard). I'm happy to see him continuing to get work in it. :)

He had an excellent recurring role as Brenda's defense lawyer in The Closer and he was hilarious! A total departure from his usual vaguely sinister/ambiguous characters. I think once genre gets you, you totall get sucked in. Mike Vogel was on Bates Motel which isn't genre (there's no sci-fi or fantasy in it) but it's created by Carlton Cuse, who spoke very highly of Jack Bender and Brian K. Vaughn (Lost people) who work on Under the Dome and that was a major reason why he took the role on that show.

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